Tag Archives: periodontitis

Is There a Link Between Alzheimer’s and Gum Disease? | Palm Harbor Dentist

According to US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 68 percent of senior Americans (65+ years) have moderate or severe gum disease with 1 in 5 adults having lost all of their teeth. Alzheimer’s disease also serves as the prelude or leading cause of dementia and affects more than 6.2 million Americans in 2021. Why the stats? There may be a link between the two.

In 2013, Health Day News published an article pertaining research results that found a linkage between gum disease and Alzheimer’s. During this study, researchers analyzed brain samples of 10 individuals with Alzheimer’s and 10 individuals without a brain disease; the results were startling. Those with Alzheimer’s showed gum disease-related bacteria in the brain, while no bacteria were found in the brain samples from individuals without Alzheimer’s.

More recently, a 2016 study by University of Southampton and King’s College London set out to determine whether or not periodontitis or gum disease was linked to the severity of dementia. The subsequent cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s patients and seem to back up the original theories. Researchers concluded that because bacteria can enter the bloodstream from the mouth, the bacteria can travel its way through the blood and to the brain, causing potential hazards in the neurological region.

Growing evidence from a number of studies links the body’s inflammatory response to increased rates of cognitive decline, suggesting that it would be worth exploring whether the treatment of gum disease might also benefit the treatment of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Just one more reminder that it is important to keep up with our daily dental routines.

If you’re interested in learning more about the Alzheimer’s and gum disease connection, contact Dr. Lieberman at 727-785-8017 to schedule a consultation today. Or visit www.dentist-lieberman.com for additional information.

Dr. Larry Lieberman proudly accepts patients from Palm Harbor and all surrounding areas.

Breaking the Myth: Periodontal Disease Edition | Palm Harbor Dentist

gum disease myth

According to the American Academy of Periodontology, three out of four Americans suffer from some form of gum disease. Despite the major prevalence, only three percent of those individuals actually seek treatment for their gum disease. With more research indicating that gum disease may be linked to several other diseases, maintaining healthy teeth and gums have become more and more important. Here are some common things in which the AAP have deemed misconceptions about oral health that should help you distinguish signs of gum disease:

Bleeding gums are not important.

Red, swollen, and bleeding gums are an important sign of periodontal disease. If you notice bleeding while brushing or flossing on a regular basis, you should schedule a visit with your dental professional in order to be evaluated for periodontal disease right away.

You don’t need to floss every day.

Having a set oral health routine is incredibly important. This includes keeping up with brushing AND flossing. Doing one without the other is giving opportunities for harmful bacteria to wreak havoc on your dental health.

A tooth lost to gum disease is lost forever.

This is not true, but not exactly false either. While gum disease is a major cause of tooth loss, and you tooth is indeed lost forever, periodontists use procedures such as dental implants to replace teeth.

Poor oral hygiene is the only way to develop gum disease.

Good oral hygiene can definitely contribute to the prevention of gum disease, however there are other factors in which having good oral hygiene won’t matter. For example, using tobacco increases your chances of developing gum disease by a large amount.

If you’re interested in learning more about periodontal disease, contact Dr. Lieberman at 727-785-8017 to schedule a consultation today. Or visit www.dentist-lieberman.com for additional information.

Dr. Larry Lieberman proudly accepts patients from Palm Harbor and all surrounding areas.

Busting the Myth Gum Disease Style | Palm Harbor Dentist

gum disease myth

If there is one thing that patients worry about when it comes to dental visits, it’s hearing they’ve had a bad checkup and need further dental work. One of these issues would be gum disease. While there are four stages to it, early detection is best in order to remedy the situation. Unfortunately, there are loads of myths about gum disease that cause patients to be confused as to how it develops or how to prevent it. With more research indicating that gum disease may be linked to several other diseases, maintaining healthy teeth and g ums have become more and more important, so let’s take a moment to bust the more common myths regarding gum disease:

Bleeding gums are not important.

Red, swollen, and bleeding gums are a telltale sign of gum disease. If you notice bleeding while brushing or flossing, you should schedule a visit with your dental professional to be evaluated for periodontal disease right away.

You don’t need to floss every day.

Having proper oral hygiene is incredibly important, and that includes keeping up with brushing, rinsing and flossing.

A tooth lost to gum disease is lost forever.

While you can’t get a permanent tooth back if it falls out because of gum disease, there is no need to worry about having the gap in your teeth – periodontists use dental implants to replace teeth.

Poor oral hygiene is the only way to develop gum disease.

Good oral hygiene can definitely contribute to the prevention of gum disease, however there are other factors in which having good oral hygiene won’t matter. For example, tobacco use or a poor diet. Both of these can increase your chances of gum disease development.

If you’re interested in learning more about porcelain veneers, contact Dr. Lieberman at 727-785-8017 to schedule a consultation today. Or visit www.dentist-lieberman.com for additional information.

Dr. Larry Lieberman proudly accepts patients from Palm Harbor and all surrounding areas.

Could Gum Disease Be Linked to Alzheimer’s? | Palm Harbor Dentist

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 64 percent of senior Americans (65+ years) have moderate or severe gum disease. Alzheimer’s disease also serves as the prelude or leading cause of dementia, and affects more than 5 million Americans. Why the stats? There may be a link between the two.

In 2013, Health Day News published an article pertaining research results that found a linkage between Gum Disease and Alzheimer’s. During this study, researchers analyzed brain samples of 10 individuals with Alzheimer’s and 10 individuals without a brain disease; the results were startling. Those with Alzheimer’s showed gum disease-related bacteria in the brain, while no bacteria was found in the brain samples from individuals without Alzheimer’s.

More recently, a 2016 study by University of Southampton and King’s College London set out to determine whether or not periodontitis or gum disease was linked to the severity of dementia. The subsequent cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s patients and seem to back up the original theories. Researchers concluded that because bacteria can enter the bloodstream from the mouth, the bacteria can travel its way through the blood and to the brain, causing potential hazards in the neurological region.

Growing evidence from a number of studies links the body’s inflammatory response to increased rates of cognitive decline, suggesting that it would be worth exploring whether the treatment of gum disease might also benefit the treatment of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Just one more reminder that it is important to keep up with our daily dental routines.

If you’re interested in learning more about periodontitis, contact Dr. Larry Lieberman, DDS at 727-785-8017 to schedule a consultation today. Or visit www.dentist-lieberman.com for additional information.

Dr. Larry Lieberman proudly accepts patients from Safety Harbor, Palm Harbor, Clearwater, Dunedin, Tarpon Springs and surrounding areas.